Upcoming Events

See Dr. Hinduja or Dr. Patchin in action!

Dr. Hinduja and Dr. Patchin regularly present to individual school districts, parent groups, or private organizations (closed to the public).  Occasionally, however, they present at conferences, community workshops, or training events that are open to the public.

Please see their Presentations page for more information, please fill out this form to inquire about a possible event. To read some testimonials from those who have attended their workshops and presentations, please click here. Agendas and summary sheets are available for you to review discussion topics and issues, which can be customized to best meet your needs. They also perform survey research, interviews, focus groups, content analyses, data analyses, and evaluation studies for schools and other organizations that deal with children and adolescents.

  • Mon
    20
    Oct
    2014
    St. Louis, MO

    Presentation to Educators: School Climate 2.0: Preventing Cyberbullying, Sexting, and Unsafe Social Networking One Classroom at a Time

  • Wed
    29
    Oct
    2014
    New Richmond, MN

    Private school event at NRHEG. Parent presentation in the evening. Interested parents should contact the school.

  • Mon
    17
    Nov
    2014
    San Diego, CA

    Research panel participant and breakout presentation speaker. More info here: http://www.ibpaworld.org/2014-ibpa-conference/program/

  • Wed
    19
    Nov
    2014
    2:00 pmSan Francisco, CA

    Wed, Nov 19, 2:00 to 3:20pm, Marriott, Salon 2, B2 Level

    This will be a short (15 minute) research presentation at an academic conference. Here is the abstract:

    If one pays attention to the news reports of cyberbullying incidents, one is likely to believe that these inappropriate online behaviors are occurring at epidemic levels. Indeed, it seems as though serious cyberbullying incidents occur (or at least are reported) at an almost constant rate. But are the media reports an accurate portrayal of the prevalence of cyberbullying among teens? Furthermore, have incidents really been increasing over the last decade, as one might expect given the increased availability and portability of technology? The current paper examines this question by reviewing three waves of data collected between 2007 and 2014 from one large school district in the southern United States. Results show a small increase in cyberbullying behaviors over that time period. Implications for policy and future research will also be discussed.

    More info: http://asc41.com/Annual_Meeting/programs/2014/2014Program.html