High School Assembly

Posted by Justin W. Patchin on July 5, 2013

For students in high school, this presentation encourages the safe and responsible use of technology. Cyberbullying is explained and high school students are encouraged to be leaders in their school when it comes to combating online harm. The presentation also stresses the importance of online reputations and the (mis)use of Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and other social media sites. Adolescents need to know that what they post or send in cyberspace could remain there for a long time – even after they delete those provocative pictures or inappropriate messages. It then covers the negative implications that stem from carelessness or foolishness on the Internet, and how it can affect athletic participation, college admission, work opportunities, and social relationships.

(about 45 minutes)

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Middle/Intermediate School Assembly

Posted by Justin W. Patchin on July 4, 2013

In this presentation middle-school students (grades 6-8) learn that cyberbullying is not acceptable under any circumstances, and that any type of bullying is a serious matter. It is also pointed out that cyberbullying is actually much easier to document and track than other forms of bullying and therefore is often more likely to lead to consequences. In addition, victims of cyberbullying (or those who witness cyberbullying) are encouraged to talk to an adult they trust. General issues of online safety and responsibility are also presented.

(about 45 minutes)

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Full-day Educator Workshop

Posted by Justin W. Patchin on July 2, 2013

This is our most popular workshop for educators. Schools can bring in either Dr. Patchin or Dr. Hinduja (depending on availability) to spend the day with teachers, counselors, and administrators. All aspects of cyberbullying, social networking, and sexting are covered; that is, each of the Educator Briefings previously described is covered in detail. Plenty of time is available throughout the day to discuss issues specific to your district. After participating in this comprehensive workshop, educators will be able to:

– Identify popular online environments among adolescents today and recognize various forms of cyberbullying;
– Understand the potential emotional, psychological, and behavioral consequences of cyberbullying;
– Identify how adolescents are using social networking websites and teach youth how to use social networking responsibly;
– Know how to respond to cyberbullying incidents and the extent to which school personnel can get involved in cases that involve electronic communication (on or off campus);
– Describe the current legal issues concerning cyberbullying;
– Know the necessary elements of a comprehensive school cyberbullying policy;
– Recognize warning signs and identify important strategies for preventing cyberbullying; and,
– Much, much more!

(6 classroom hours)

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Parent and Community Presentation

Posted by Justin W. Patchin on

Designed for parents and community partners, this presentation provides a broad overview of adolescent technological concerns, including cyberbullying, social networking, and sexting. The specific content of the presentation can be customized to the interests of the group. This is a perfect presentation for libraries, parent/teacher groups, churches, and other neighborhood groups.

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Adolescent Girls and their Online Experiences

Posted by Justin W. Patchin on

Adolescent girls tend to participate in more indirect, less visible forms of bullying, including psychological and emotional harassment (e.g., rumor spreading and other forms of relational aggression). Given the fact that the vast majority of cyberbullying behaviors involve these indirect forms of harassment, it makes sense that most research suggests that girls appear equally as likely to be active participants – as either targets or aggressors. This presentation discusses the ways, reasons, and contexts in which girls engage in online cruelty towards others based on quantitative and qualitative data collected from thousands of randomly-selected youth. Attention is also given to girls’ use of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and other platforms – and how what they post and share may open themselves up to embarrassment, disgrace, defamation, and other forms of victimization. By way of many case studies and examples, as well as a focus on self-respect, dignity, integrity, and locus of control, attendees will learn how best to encourage adolescent girls to protect themselves, their reputation, and their content in cyberspace.

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